Seasonal Beers

whisky_fringe_profileWith summer sadly on its way out, lets take a look at some of the exciting seasonal beers that will compensate for the lack of sunlight. First up, a beer style we look forward to every year: Oktoberfest Beers

With summer sadly on its way out, lets take a look at some of the exciting seasonal beers that will compensate for the lack of sunlight. First up, a beer style we look forward to every year: Oktoberfest Beers

Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest is a 16 day event in Munich (19th September-October 4th) There is a funfair, food, music and plenty of beer. Over 6 million people attend, making it the biggest beer festival in the world. The 6 traditional Munich brewers produce special beers for Oktoberfest, which they serve at the festival and bottle a small amount. Other brewers pay homage to the Oktoberfest style (a Marzen style lager) with their own versions. Stocks are limited, so grab them while you can.

Pumpkin2007

As Oktoberfest ends,  we’ll be moving on to one of America’s big seasonal beers; pumpkin beer. Pumpkins are one of the most popular crops in the United States and are harvested in September. Pumpkin beers are generally available in the build up to Halloween.

This is still to be 100% confirmed, but we should be getting pumpkin beers from Brooklyn, Flying Dog, Stewart Brewing and potentially a few others. Tim Blades from Stewart Brewing will also be in our Bruntsfield shop on Friday the 2nd of October may have some of their pumpkin beer to sample.

HoppedyHop

We will also be trying to get hold of some wet-hopped and fresh hopped beers. Here’s a good explanation of what these are from the Sierra Nevada website:

Wet Hops are un-dried hops, picked and shipped from the growing fields within 24 hours.

Fresh Hops are the freshest dried hops to come from the fields, typically within seven days of harvest.
Over 90% of the world’s hop harvest happens between August 31 and October 31, and these hops are used throughout the calendar year. Can hops possibly be the same on November 1, one day after harvest, as they are on July 25, nearly one year after growing in the fields? The answer is no. We think of hops like dry kitchen spices—the flavor of thyme or rosemary right after the jar is opened is far more intense than it is six months later. The same can be said for hops.”

With most beers being made with older dried hops, fresh and wet hopped beers are worth trying, as using hops fresh from the harvest adds big citrus and fruit notes, and generally more hop impact.

That’s plenty of beer to keep you going for now. Next up, there will be Autumn ales and Christmas ales.

Drinkmonger

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